Sex Positions With Pelvic Conditions

Sex with Prolapse and Other Pelvic Conditions - Find the Best Position for You...

Pelvic Floor Muscle Dysfunction

Problems with your pelvic floor can result in many unpleasant conditions, including rectocele and pelvic pain. Hopefully if you suffer from any of these you are already doing your Kegels to ease and lessen your symptoms – this will also help to improve sex for you and your partner. If you have chronic pelvic pain, it can be best to avoid the missionary position as this causes your uterus to be tilted at an angle that can hurt. Good suggestions are spooning on your side or woman on top with pillows under your partner’s thighs – this allows you to easily manage how much penetration occurs and stop things if they start to hurt. In some instances, pelvic pain is cause by your muscles being too tight, making your vagina difficult to penetrate. Vaginal dilators can help you to solve this problem – they come in a set of different girths so that you can encourage your muscles to relax in your own time.

Sex Post-Partum

Right after having a baby, sex will most likely be the last thing on your mind! It is recommended that you refrain outright from intercourse for at least 6 weeks after giving birth to ensure that you’re fully healed. The stress, fatigue and general chaos of having a new-born will have major effects on your sex life – not to mention that you’ll be dealing with the physical after effects of giving birth, whether vaginally or through C-section. Try not to worry! Even after six weeks you may not have regained your libido, it is important not to put pressure on yourself to rush back into sex before you are ready both physically and emotionally.

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A Word From Stephanie Taylor

There are several health problems that may have brought you to the Kegel8 website – the pelvic floor is a complicated part of the body and a lot can go wrong when it’s not strong enough. The symptoms of your pelvic floor condition might make you feel like less of a sexual being – there’s so much pressure on women to have a ‘perfect’ body that even the most beautiful of us lack confidence sometimes!

We’re here to help; we’ve done some research on sex and prolapse, because we believe that everyone should be able to have a fun, satisfying and worry-free sex life. ‘But really, can you have sex with a prolapse?’ – the answer is a definite yes, and we’ve got some great tips on how to make the most of it!


As well as the information within this article, we are pleased to be able to provide you with this FREE GUIDE to Successful Sex Positions for Medical Conditions, courtesy of Renew Physical Therapy, New York. With this guide you can identify your condition and cross reference it with recommended sexual positions as well as sexual positions to avoid.

Your partner may be keener than you are at first as he or she has not experienced the physical trauma of labour; it’s important to communicate with each other about how you’re feeling and to let them know why you don’t feel ready, reassuring them that it’s not a rejection. Remember that sex should be pleasurable for both of you rather than a chore. Maintaining non-sexual physical contact like cuddling will help you to sustain your closeness as a couple while you’re still recovering. When you do begin to have full intercourse, you may find that it’s uncomfortable to begin with due to the changes in your body. It’s advisable to go slowly and avoid any positions that involve deep penetration – try spooning with your partner in front or behind you, as this will give you control over how deep his thrusts are.

Prolapse and Sex

‘Can I have sex with a prolapse?’ Yes! Whether your prolapse is uterine, rectal or cystocele, you can still enjoy intimacy with your partner. An excellent position to try is a modified version of missionary; on your back with pillows under your pelvis. This will tilt you so that your prolapse retracts into your body, lessening discomfort and reassuring you that it’s out of the way. It is very difficult for anyone who’s not a doctor to detect a prolapse, so you don’t need to be worried about your partner feeling it. Positions to avoid if you are having sex with a prolapse are any that involve standing up and ‘cow girl’ positions (woman on top). Ensuring that you use plenty of lubrication is important to lessen discomfort; try a water-based one as these are gentler on your body.

If you have had your prolapse repaired by a doctor, you may be wondering about sex after prolapse surgery. The surgery you’ve had is major and requires adequate recovery time – it can take up to 6 to 8 weeks before the pain subsides. Your doctor will be able to give you the all clear when your body is fully ready. Even once you are given the ok for sex, you may not feel ready; take your time and consider easing yourself in with other sexual activities before trying full intercourse. As a result of your surgery you will probably find that your vagina is tighter than before, to the extent that you feel some discomfort with penetration. A good way of easing this is to try using dilators or an adult toy while you’re alone, as when you are by yourself you can be fully in control of the extent and depth of penetration. Using a set of vaginal dilators can be helpful as you can vary the girth and slowly work your way up to the size of a penis. You being in control is a good general rule to follow when beginning intercourse again – being on top for the first few times will mean that you’re able to react quickly to any discomfort or pain, as well as being a nice treat for your partner!

Bladder Conditions such as Coital Incontinence and Incontinence

Interstitial cystitis, painful bladder syndrome, urge incontinence – if you have a condition that makes urination painful or unpredictable then sex may be affected too due to pressure on your bladder. If you have incontinence you may have a lot of worry about the prospect of leaking during intercourse. This can be eased by avoiding positions like missionary and ‘doggy style’ (you on all fours with the man behind) as they can lead to your bladder being jostled causing pain in those with interstitial cystitis. Instead, try lying down with some pillows underneath your lower back – this will raise your pelvis and reposition your bladder, moving it out of the way.

Coital Incontinence is another major block to intimacy, in a recent poll 1 in 3 women admitted to peeing during sex and/or urinating during orgasm. Sexual incontinence is very distressing and could be due to a weak pelvic floor, so pelvic floor exercises are a must especially if you want to stop incontinence during sex.. Good sex positions to try with coital incontinence include her on top, or try sex in the shower. You may wish to avoid doggy style and missionary positions if you find peeing during sex is a problem.

If you have a catheter due to incontinence or while recovering from surgery, you may feel like sex is not an option for you. Find out if you are able to seal off or remove your catheter temporarily. If you are concerned about leakage, talk to your doctor about how much you can reduce your fluid intake before sex to reduce the risk, and consider having towels ready on or by the bed. In the event that you can’t remove or seal off your catheter, taping the tube and bag to your inner thigh should keep it out of the way – if you feel like having your drainage bag in sight is effecting the mood, consider covering it with a towel or using a long piece of extension tubing so that you can place it out of sight. Good sex positions to try with a catheter are on your side with your partner behind you or you on top.